Radical orchidectomy

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Who is suitable for a radical inguinal orchiectomy?

What are the advantages of a radical inguinal orchiectomy?

How is a radical inguinal orchiectomy performed?

What to expect after a radical inguinal orchiectomy?

Procedure outcomes

INTRODUCTION

Radical inguinal orchiectomy is a surgical procedure where a testicle and the associated spermatic cord are removed. Most commonly, this procedure forms one aspect of the definitive treatment for testicular cancer.

The surgeons at Melbourne Urology Centre are experts in managing male genitourinary cancers. They work closely with medical oncologists and radiation oncologists, to ensure that every patient receives state-of-the-art, multi-disciplinary care.

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Who is suitable for a radical inguinal orchiectomy?

Radical inguinal orchiectomy may be performed for patients who:

  • Have been diagnosed with testicular cancer, or
  • Have found a lump in their testicle and testicular cancer is suspected

What are the advantages of a radical inguinal orchiectomy?

  • The spermatic cord is removed along with the testis, reducing the risk of cancer spread to the rest of the body
  • This surgery is often the definitive treatment
  • The procedure is safe and most patients make a quick recovery

How is a radical inguinal orchiectomy performed?

  • Radical inguinal orchiectomy is performed under general anaesthetic and takes approximately an hour to complete
  • A small incision is made just above the pubic area on the affected side
  • The affected testicle is removed from through the incision along with the spermatic cord
  • The incision is then closed with dissolving stitches

A testicular prosthesis may be offered to patients undergoing radical inguinal orchiectomy. This is a very personal decision as to whether or not you choose to have one placed. If you choose to have a testicular prothesis implanted, this can be performed at the same time as your orchiectomy. This may increase the risk of infections and other complications

What to expect after a radical inguinal orchiectomy?

  • It is common to have bruising, swelling and tenderness of the scrotum for 2-4 weeks following a radical inguinal orchiectomy
  • A haematoma (blood clot in the scrotum) can occur following the procedure; wearing compression underwear can help to prevent this
  • It is important to avoid heavy lifting and strenuous activity for up to 4 weeks after surgery, to reduce the risk of an inguinal hernia forming.

Procedure outcomes

Testicular cancer is curable in the vast majority of cases, especially when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Radical inguinal orchiectomy is the most effective way to remove cancerous tumours of the testicle. In many cases of early-stage cancer, it is the first and only treatment that is required. Later stage cancers may require additional therapies such as chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

If the other testicle is healthy, the removal of one testicle does not usually have an effect on a man’s ability to gain an erection, have sex, or affect his fertility. You may be referred for sperm banking if you are required to undergo chemotherapy after surgery.

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