FAQ’s

Home FAQ’s

What is a Urologist?

A Urologist is specialist who has expertise in the surgical and medical management of problems of the male and female urinary tract, and the male reproductive system. The urinary tract in men and women includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. The male reproductive system includes the testes, prostate, penis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, and associated glands. These conditions include cancer, stones, infection, incontinence, sexual dysfunction, and pelvic floor problems.

Do I need a referral to see one of the specialists at Melbourne Urology Centre?

Yes. To see one of the specialists at Melbourne Urology Centre, we require a referral from your general practitioner (GP). A referral from your GP will be valid for 12 months duration and will also be required to obtain your Medicare rebate.

What do I need to bring to my appointment?

So that we have all the necessary information, it is important to bring along:

  • A valid referral
  • Any pathology or radiology reports or images pertaining to your condition
  • Medicare card
  • Private health card
  • Any government issued health benefit cards e.g. aged pension card
  • Department of Veterans Affairs card
  • A list of your current medications

How long can I expect to wait for an appointment?

Appointment wait times are generally between 1-2 weeks, however all referrals are triaged and patients with urgent conditions will be seen sooner.

Do you offer Telehealth?

Where possible, we can see patients by Telehealth.

Is my consultation fee covered by Medicare?

Payment of the account in full is required at the time of consultation and we will then be able to lodge the Medicare claim on your behalf at the time of your visit. Our administrative team will let you know the costs that may be incurred prior to your consultation.

DVA patient costs are fully covered by the Department of Veterans Affairs on production of a gold/white card.

Aged pension rates available.

Public vs Private Care

Both Mr Shekib Shahbaz and Mr Tony de Sousa are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to both insured and non-insured patients.

Should you elect to be admitted as a public patient in a public hospital, you are not given the option of choosing your preferred doctor and your operation may be performed by a Registrar or Fellow training in this field of expertise. As a public patient you will be advised of your procedure date through the associated public hospital.

As a private patient at Melbourne Urology Centre you have the choice of your preferred doctor as per your referral, and your operation date is discussed and arranged in consultation with you.

Admission as a private patient can incur expenses in addition to those rebated by Medicare or your health fund.

Post-operative Information

Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)

  • What to expect
    • Minor bruising may be noticeable on the skin on your back at the site of the procedure, you may take paracetamol or ibuprofen for discomfort
    • Blood in the urine is common and may last for a day or so after the procedure. Ensure you drink plenty of fluids
    • Stone fragments – you may notice the passage of ‘gravel’ (stone fragments) in the urine.
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – no driving for 24 hours or until painfree
    • Work – you will require some time off work. The duration will depend upon your occupation. In general you could return to light duties after 24 hours. You should discuss this with your surgeon prior to your procedure to arrange a certificate
    • Lifting – avoid heavy lifting for 1 week after your procedure to minimize the chance of secondary bleeding
    • Activities – walking is fine and encouraged after your procedure. Strenuous activity including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming should be avoided for one week
  • Follow up schedule
    • Follow up depends upon the size and number of stones treated. This will generally vary between 1-3 months after the procedure. Your surgeon will usually request a follow up scan to be done prior to your appointment. 
  • When to go to emergency
    • Inability to urinate – this is rare but may occur if there is significant blood in the urine
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection
    • Severe back or flank pain that cannot be controlled with discharge medication

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

Hydrocele or epididymal cyst surgery

  • What to expect
    • Bruising may be noticeable on the skin
    • Minor bleeding may be present from the wound. You can wear a light pad in the underwear if necessary
    • Swelling may persist for a number of weeks after the procedure
    • Scrotal discomfort will generally resolve one to two weeks after surgery
    • We suggest using supportive underwear and using simple paracetamol and ibuprofen as needed
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – no driving for one week or until comfortable
    • Work – you will require some time off work. The duration will depend upon your occupation. In general you could return to light duties within a week. You should discuss this with your surgeon prior to surgery to arrange a certificate
    • Lifting – avoid heavy lifting for at least 2 weeks after surgery to minimize the chance of secondary bleeding
    • Activities – walking is fine and encouraged after surgery. Strenuous activity including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming should be avoided for 2 weeks
    • Sex – avoid for 2 weeks 
    • You can shower after 24 hours but avoid soaking in the bath for at least one week. Keep the wound dry and clean.
  • Follow up schedule
    • The suture material used to close the wound is dissolvable but may take a number of weeks
    • Routine follow up is conducted after 6-8 weeks to allow healing to take place
  • When to go to emergency
    • Severe bruising and swelling – this may be due to secondary bleeding. This is uncommon but can occur within the first week or so after surgery
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

Trans-perineal prostate biopsy

  • What to expect
    • Blood in the urine is common for a few days after the procedure (this may be intermittent) but may occasionally take longer to resolve
    • Blood in the semen is common and may persist for a few weeks. It may be bright blood or brownish old blood. This is because the prostate produces most of the semen fluid. It is not dangerous and may be intermittent.
    • Burning and stinging with urination – this may last for a day or so after the procedure, particularly if you have a flexible cystoscopy at the time of the biopsy. This does not usually indicate infection. Ural (available over-counter at chemist) may assist in alleviating symptoms.
    • Bruising or discomfort in the perineum (area between the legs) is common. Paracetamol or ibuprofen may be helpful.
  • Return to activity
    • Most men are able to return to their normal activities within a day or so of the procedure
    • Driving can be resumed after 24 hours
    • Work – depending upon your occupation, you may be able to return to work the following day however we recommend taking at least one day off
    • Lifting – avoid heavy lifting for 48 hours
    • Activities – most activities including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming should be fine after 48 hours
    • Sex – avoid for 48 hours; there will most likely be blood in the semen but this is not dangerous 
  • Follow up schedule
    • The results of your biopsy may take a week or more to be available. Most patients will have an appointment scheduled within 2 weeks. You may discuss the option of a phone call with your surgeon
  • When to go to emergency
    • Unable to urinate – this may be due to swelling of the prostate or bleeding and clots
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

TURP (transurethral resection of prostate)

  • What to expect
    • Improved urinary flow, pressure, bladder emptying
    • Blood in urine is common for 2-4 weeks after surgery (this may be intermittent) but may take longer to resolve
    • Urinary frequency and urgency (urinating often and in a hurry) as well as nocturia (waking at night time) typically takes longer to improve and most patients will settle within 3 months. In some circumstances these symptoms may persist. Some patients may benefit from bladder re-training with a pelvic floor physiotherapist
    • Burning and stinging with urination – this may last for days or even weeks after surgery. This does not usually indicate infection but is part of the healing process. Ural (available over-counter at chemist) may assist in alleviating symptoms.
    • Ejaculation changes – retrograde (dry) ejaculation is common (90%), expected and if it occurs is permanent. This is not dangerous
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – no driving for 2 weeks following surgery
    • Work – you will require some time off work. The duration will depend upon your occupation. You should discuss this with your surgeon prior to surgery to arrange a certificate
    • Lifting – avoid heavy lifting or straining to open bowels for at least 4 weeks after surgery to minimize chance of secondary bleeding
    • Activities – walking is fine and encouraged after surgery. Strenuous activity including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming should be avoided for 4 weeks
    • Sex – avoid for 4 weeks 
  • Follow up schedule
    • Routine follow up is conducted after 6-8 weeks to allow healing and time for symptoms to stabilize
  • When to go to emergency
    • Unable to urinate – this may be due to secondary bleeding and clots. This can occur within the first month or so after surgery
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

Vasectomy

  • What to expect
    • Bruising may be noticeable on the skin
    • Minor bleeding may be present from the wound. You can wear a light pad in the underwear if necessary
    • Scrotal discomfort will generally resolve within a week
    • The suture material used to close the wound is dissolvable and this will take a number of weeks
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – you can drive after 24 hours
    • Work – you may require some time off work. The duration will depend upon your occupation. In general you could return to light duties after a day or so. You should discuss this with your surgeon prior to surgery to arrange a certificate
    • Lifting – avoid heavy lifting for one week after surgery to minimize the chance of secondary bleeding
    • Activities – walking is fine and encouraged after surgery. Strenuous activity including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming should be avoided for one week
    • Sex – avoid for 48 hours or until you are comfortable. Vasectomy is not effective immediately. You must use another form of contraception until you are given clearance
    • You can shower after 24 hours but avoid soaking in the bath for at least one week. Keep the wound clean and dry.
  • When to go to emergency
    • Severe bruising and swelling – this may be due to secondary bleeding. This is uncommon but can occur within the first week or so after surgery
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection
  • Follow up schedule
    • Vasectomy is not effective immediately. You must use another form of contraception until you are given clearance
    • In general, it takes at least 2 or 3 months (and at least 20 ejaculations) to achieve sterility. You will need to do a semen check to confirm this
    • Routine follow up is conducted after 2-3 months

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

TURBT (transurethral resection of bladder tumour)

  • What to expect
    • Blood in urine is common for 2-4 weeks after surgery (this may be intermittent) but may take longer to resolve.  The internal lining of the bladder takes time to heal
    • Urinary frequency and urgency (urinating often and in a hurry) as well as nocturia (waking at night time) typically settles within four weeks. In some circumstances these symptoms may persist longer. 
    • Burning and stinging with urination – this may last for days or even weeks after surgery. This does not usually indicate infection but is part of the healing process. Ural (available over-counter at chemist) may assist in alleviating symptoms.
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – no driving for 2 weeks following surgery
    • Work – you will require some time off work. The duration will depend upon your occupation. You should discuss this with your surgeon prior to surgery to arrange a certificate
    • Lifting – avoid heavy lifting or straining to open bowels for at least 4 weeks after surgery to minimize chance of secondary bleeding
    • Activities – walking is fine and encouraged after surgery. Strenuous activity including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming should be avoided for 4 weeks
    • Sex – avoid for 4 weeks 
  • Follow up schedule
    • Routine follow up is conducted within 2-3 weeks to discuss results of the pathology. The healing process and stabilization of symptoms may take longer
  • When to go to emergency
    • Unable to urinate
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection
    • Severe abdominal pain or distension

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

Ureteroscopy and Stent

  • What to expect
    • Discomfort in the abdomen and flank on the side of the procedure is common. If you have a stent, this may persist until it is removed.  The pain may be worse when urinating as urine refluxes up the stent into the kidney.  This is not dangerous. Try to avoid straining when passing urine.
    • Blood in urine is common for after surgery (this may be intermittent) and may last for as long as the stent is in place. The extent can vary based on activity or your hydration.  This will generally resolve within a few days of the stent being removed
    • Urinary frequency and urgency (urinating often and in a hurry) as well as nocturia (waking at night time) is common while the ureteric stent is in place. Often you will have a strong urge to pass only a small amount of urine. This is because the stent irritates the lining of the bladder. This will generally resolve within a few days of the stent being removed. Your surgeon may prescribe medication if these symptoms are severe.
    • Burning and stinging with urination – is common for after surgery (this may be intermittent) and may last for as long as the stent is in place. This will generally resolve within a few days of the stent being removed. This does not usually indicate infection unless fever is present. Ural (available over-counter at chemist) may assist in alleviating symptoms.
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – no driving for 24 hours following surgery. You should refrain for longer if you are in pain or using strong pain-killers
    • Work – you will require some time off work. The duration will depend upon your occupation. You will typically require 1-2 days off.
    • Lifting – may exacerbate symptoms and bleeding due to the stent but there are no restrictions unless otherwise specified
    • Activities – you may participate in your usual activities including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming within your comfort levels.  This may exacerbate symptoms including blood in the urine.
    • Sex – no restrictions unless instructed otherwise.
  • Follow up schedule
    • A stent will usually need to remain in place for between 2-4 weeks depending on the surgery.
    • In most cases a follow up scan will be arranged 3-4 after surgery or after the stent has been removed
  • When to go to emergency
    • Unable to urinate
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection

Please note that whilst a ureteric stent is most often necessary as part of minimally invasive stone or ureteric surgery, this must be removed after the treatment is completed. If you have any concerns about timing of your stent removal please contact the rooms for clarification.

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

Circumcision

  • What to expect
    • Pain – Local anaesthetic will be administered at the time of surgery so ensure you are comfortable when you wake up. You will notice some discomfort as this wears off over a number of hours. You will be prescribed pain-killers to go home with. Some pain/discomfort is expected for up to six weeks.
    • Sutures are absorbable and may in some cases take up to three months to fall off
    • Bleeding from the wound is common for first few days but may take longer to resolve. You should try to leave the dressings in place for 24-48 hours or as instructed by your surgeon
    • Penile sensitivity is common after this surgery and typically resolves within 6 weeks but may take longer in some cases
    • Swelling – some swelling and redness is to be expected around the wound as it heals. This typically resolves within 6 weeks but may take longer in some cases
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – no driving for first 24 hours and until comfortable to do so
    • Work – you will require some time off work. The duration will depend upon your occupation. You should plan to have at least one week off. You should discuss this with your surgeon prior to surgery to arrange a certificate
    • Lifting – avoid heavy lifting or straining for at least 2 weeks after surgery to minimize chance of secondary bleeding
    • Activities – walking is fine and encouraged after surgery. Strenuous activity including running, gym, golf, cycling and swimming should be avoided for 4 weeks
    • Sex – avoid for 4-6 weeks 
  • Follow up schedule
    • Routine follow up is conducted after 2-3 months to allow for healing
  • When to go to emergency
    • Bleeding that cannot be controlled with light compression
    • Progressive and expanding swelling of the wound – may indicate bleeding
    • Unable to urinate – this is uncommon
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

Flexible Cystoscopy

  • What to expect
    • Full bladder – during the procedure your bladder will be filled with sterile water and you will need to urinate immediately afterwards
    • Burning and stinging with urination – this is common and may last for a few days following the procedure. This does not usually indicate infection unless you are also unwell. This is due to irritation of the urethra during the procedure. Ural (available over-counter at chemist) may assist in alleviating symptoms.
    • Blood in urine is common for a few days after the procedure (this may be intermittent) but may take longer to resolve. You should ensure adequate fluid intake.
    • Urinary frequency and urgency (urinating often and in a hurry) as well as nocturia (waking up at night time) could also be present for a few days.
  • Return to activity
    • Driving – avoid for 24 hours if procedure performed with sedation
    • Work – return the following day unless otherwise instructed
    • Lifting – no restrictions unless otherwise instructed
    • Activities – no restrictions on general activities including running, cycling, gym, golf, swimming unless otherwise instructed
    • Sex – no restrictions unless otherwise instructed

If you cannot find what you need please email reception@urodoc.com.au or call 1300 702 811

  • Follow up schedule
    • Your follow up will be based on the indication for procedure.  You should be advised of your follow up instructions prior to discharge from the hospital.
    • Patients with bladder cancer will require ongoing scheduled follow-up cystoscopy
  • When to go to emergency
    • Unable to urinate
    • Fever, chills or shakes – this may indicate infection
Request an Appointment

We are here to assist you before, during and after your visit to the Melbourne Urology Centre. To request an appointment, simply complete the form below and we will contact you within 48 hours to confirm your appointment with us. For urgent enquiries or consulations please contact us on 1300 702 811